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GOP Healthcare Exempts Congressional Employees From Buying Trumpcare

The Hill reports that as Republicans rush to vote on their latest ObamaCare repeal-and-replace plan, it appears to still include an item exempting members of Congress and their staffs from losing the healthcare bill’s popular provisions.

House GOP leaders worked Wednesday night to fast-track consideration of an amended American Health Care Act without posting the bill text and without a Congressional Budget Office analysis detailing the effects of the latest changes to the legislation.

After Vox reported that the bill appeared to still include the exemption for lawmakers, Rep. Tom MacArthur’s (R-N.J.) office said separate legislation would close that loophole.

All members of Congress and their staff are required, like every other ObamaCare enrollee, to buy coverage through the ObamaCare marketplace.

The House Rules Committee approved procedural rules Wednesday night to fast-track consideration of both the GOP healthcare bill and the separate measure to address the potential congressional exemption.

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CBO Report – Republican’s Plan Increases Healthcare by 750% For Elderly

According to the Congressional Budget Office’s Report, the new Republican proposed Healthcare bill would increase healthcare costs on people 64 and older by 750%.

The bill does bring down overall premiums in the individual market by about 10 percent by 2026 compared with what they would be under current law, the CBO found. But the CBO includes a big caveat: This would greatly differ based on age and income.

The CBO offers an example of a single individual with an annual income of $26,500.

If that person is 21 years old, he’ll largely benefit from the Republican health care bill. Under the Affordable Care Act (also known as Obamacare), he would on average pay $1,700 in premiums for insurance. Under the Republican plan, he would pay $1,450.

But if that person is 64 years old, he would be hurt by the Republican bill. Under Obamacare, he would also pay $1,700 in premiums for insurance. But under the Republican bill, he would pay $14,600 — more than half his annual income. That amounts to more than a 750 percent increase in premiums from Obamacare to the Republican bill.