Democracy #Featured

The Dotard Wants War and Concussions

Take that, you John McCain you.

And NFL players who kneel for the national anthem? You need to speak the way we want you to speak. And hit harder, man! Be like Aaron Hernandez.

But what’s happening with Stephen Curry you ask? We don’t want your NBA Championship demeanor and terrific play and ambassador-like personality anywhere near the White House. You’re not invited!

Kim Jong-un should not, in any way, feel singled out. But I certainly understand how hurt he must be that the old man in the White House is yelling at him for having a nuclear program and firing missiles into the air above our allies’ heads. ‘Rocket Man’ is a good song. He should see it as a compliment.

In other words, international diplomacy has been reduced to name calling and 6th grade playground theatrics. Remind me again; who thought it was a good idea to elect Donald Trump? Yes, I’m sure the base loves the muscular response, which they see as a refreshing change from those pantywaist presidents named Clinton, Bush and Obama. Threatening a scurrilous, dangerous, immoral dictator will get us what we want because, after all, we’re the United States and all dictators cower when the president tells them he is unhappy.

Just look at Iran. They can certainly see that Donald Trump is going to decertify the nuclear agreement we signed with them two years ago. What the president doesn’t see is that this is going to make him an unreliable deal-making partner with Iran, North Korea and any other country who might have an interest n United States’ affairs and trade. The simple, elegant “No” will be this year’s most diplomatic response, and one that will not make the White House happy. Not that the past 30 years of State Department public and private efforts have done much about North Korea. They’ve ignored agreements, broken them and generally thumbed their noses at us. But we could always say that we acted in an adult, dignified, internationally-approved manner while it was happening. In short, we were a role model for the democracies we represented. This administration has spent all of that political capital in nine months. Pregnancies should go better than this.

Just to show that a lack of diplomacy should not be limited to the world stage, the president has now picked a fight with Senator McCain for rightly opposing a disastrous bill that’s not really related to health care, but to the tax savings it can generate for the $1.5 trillion dollar giveaway to the rich that the GOP has been salivating over since January.

Our federal system is a wonderful creation, but health insurance should not be subject to the whims of governors and state legislators who have, shall we say, a spotty record when it comes to science, women’s health care, birth control, budget-balancing tricks and recognizing that religious belief will not cure all of our ills. All Americans should receive health care that takes into account their basic needs and doesn’t allow anyone to charge them more for pre-existing conditions, maternity care, mental health or addiction services. What’s worse is that this bill would penalize those states that expanded Medicaid to cover their most vulnerable citizens and give more money to those that shunned Obamacare. 

Which means, in our contradictory world, that those states that despise federal involvement in their affairs will be the largest beneficiaries of…federal largess.

And really, some people, like the president, should just stay away from sports. Yes, the man plays golf. Oh, does he play golf! But in every other way, he misunderstands the professional sports culture in the same way that he misunderstands larger American culture. The athletes and teams that have decided not to visit the White House are doing so because of the president’s words and actions, rather than as a result of some media cabal his supporters blame for his low poll numbers. Because, really, will professional football become a better game by having more players suffer concussions and brain damage and CTE?

As for the national anthem? Until 2009, NFL players used to stay in their locker rooms when the national anthem was played. You’d think the players had stood on the sidelines since 1814, when the song was written, but in fact that is not the case. You’d also think that they were the first athletes to cause controversy around the anthem, but that isn’t true either, if you take Muhammad Ali, Tommie Smith, John Carlos and a host of other athletes into account. The opposition to the president’s words have come from players, coaches and NFL owners, many of whom are staunchly Republican. They get it. The president does not.

I understand that Trump is angry because it looks like the health scare law will lose, North Korea will not back down and his preferred candidate in the Alabama Republican Senate primary is behind in the polls. He’s not the first president to face multiple crises.

But he’s not helping himself or the country with his shameful responses.

For more, go to www.facebook.com/WhereDemocracyLives or Twitter @rigrundfest

Politics

John McCain – “Cindy and I will not vote for Donald Trump”

It took a lot to get Arizona Senator John McCain to this point. He has put up with a lot of name calling from Donald Trump, but when it became clear that Donald Trump was okay with sexually abusing and groping women, the Arizona senator said that was the last straw.

McCain released the following statement, assuring voters that he and Cindy will not be pulling the lever for Trump in November.

“In addition to my well known differences with Donald Trump on public policy issues, I have raised questions about his character after his comments on Prisoners of War, the Khan Gold Star family, Judge Curiel and earlier inappropriate comments about women. Just this week, he made outrageous statements about the innocent men in the Central Park Five case.

“As I said yesterday, there are no excuses for Donald Trump’s offensive and demeaning comments in the just released video; no woman should ever be victimized by this kind of inappropriate behavior. He alone bears the burden of his conduct and alone should suffer the consequences.

“I have wanted to support the candidate our party nominated. He was not my choice, but as a past nominee, I thought it was important I respect the fact that Donald Trump won a majority of the delegates by the rules our party set. I thought I owed his supporters that deference.

“But Donald Trump’s behavior this week, concluding with the disclosure of his demeaning comments about women and his boasts about sexual assaults, make it impossible to continue to offer even conditional support for his candidacy. Cindy, with her strong background in human rights and respect for women fully agrees with me on this.

“Cindy and I will not vote for Donald Trump. I have never voted for a Democratic presidential candidate and we will not vote for Hillary Clinton. We will write in the name of some good conservative Republican who is qualified to be President.”

Politics

John McCain’s Granddaughter says – “I’m With Her”

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Caroline McCain, the granddaughter of the 2008 Republican presidential nominee, John McCain, is a proud member of the “Never Trump” movement. In a post published by Medium, Caroline expressed her frustrations with the new leader of the Republican party, saying that Trump lost her support when he questioned her grandfather’s “war hero” status.

In a Medium post titled, “For this Republican, Never Trump means ‘I’m With Her,'” Caroline McCain writes that she became opposed to Trump last summer when he questioned her grandfather’s status as a war hero.

“I like people who weren’t captured,” Trump said at the time.

John McCain was held prisoner during the Vietnam War.

While the Arizona senator “responded with grace and forgiveness — as only a man who was held in captivity for years can,” Caroline McCain wrote, “I’ve been nursing a grudge ever since.”

“He insulted my grandfather and attacked the very qualities  —  loyalty, bravery and selflessness  —  that he and countless other POWs embody,” she added.

McCain wrote that Trump never won her over during his candidacy, calling him a “misogynist,” “racist” and “demagogue,” citing his remarks on women and minorities throughout his campaign.

She said she decided to support Clinton during the Democratic National Convention this week, where Democratic heavy-hitters touched on themes of American exceptionalism in an effort to win over reticent Republicans.

“The party I grew up in, the party I want to work in and change and push to be more inclusive, betrayed me and countless others,” McCain wrote.

“Loyalty to party can never trump loyalty to country. And loyalty to party means nothing when the party has been poisoned.”

Politics

McCain Blames Obama for Orlando Shooting – Why I Blame McCain Instead

Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., called the 800-page immigration reform bill proposed by a bipartisan group of senators a "fair, comprehensive and practical solution" to a difficult problem.

John McCain, one of the architect of the failed Iraq war that forced America more than a trillion dollars deeper in debt and caused the lives of thousands of American troops, today blamed Obama for the most recent mass shooting in Orlando. According to McCain’s twisted thinking, ISIS would not be around today if Obama had allowed the Iraq war, the longest war in America’s history, to continue indefinitely.

While answering a question from a reporter about the usual gun-control debate that sprouts up after every mass shooting, McCain inexplicably found a way to blame Obama for Orlando!

“Barack Obama is directly responsible for it,” McCain said. “Because when he pulled everybody out of Iraq, al-Qaeda went to Syria, became ISIS, and ISIS is what it is today thanks to Barack Obama’s failures.”

When pressed by a reporter on the claim that Obama was “directly” responsible, McCain reiterated his point — that Obama should not have withdrawn combat troops from Iraq: “He pulled everybody out of Iraq, and I predicted at the time that ISIS would go unchecked, and there would be attacks on the United States of America,” he said. “It’s a matter of record, so he is directly responsible.”

Noticed the masterful way McCain avoided any acknowledgement to the actual war in Iraq, a war he co-sponsored and a war that had absolutely nothing to do with the September 11th attacks on America. You would think if anyone is to be blamed for ISIS or by extension, the Orlando shooting, it would be the people who decided to invade Iraq and remove its leader, actions that threw Iraq into chaos and created the vacuum ISIS and other terrorist groups have thrived on. But McCain apparently bears no responsibility, according to him it’s all Obama’s fault.

One should note that Obama voted against the war in Iraq. If McCain and others had followed Obama’s lead, there would have been no Iraq war, no vacuum for ISIS to fill and by extension, no reason for a crazed maniac to open fire in Orlando killing 49 people while pledging his allegiance to ISIS.

Donald Trump #Politics

John McCain Call Republicans “Bastards” for Choosing Donald Trump

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And I totally agree with the Arizona senator. These Republicans are indeed bastards for putting their party before what’s best for the country.

In a recent interview with The Hugh Hewitt Show, McCain said that he cannot see a scenario where a third party candidate will be successful in challenging Donald Trump

“I just think that the people have spoken,” he said Wednesday on “The Hugh Hewitt Show.” “The fact is, the Republicans have spoken.

“Honestly, I just don’t see this scenario,” he told Hewitt. “I think you and I have heard about this ever since it appeared that Trump was going to win the nomination.

“I just don’t see it happening. One of the things that both parties have done over the years is pretty well set a system up that it’s almost impossible to challenge when the two parties have their candidates.”

McCain also shared an anecdote involving former Rep. Morris Udall (D-Ariz.) in describing his frustrations with democracy.

“I had a beloved friend named Congress Morris Udall, we called him ‘Mo’ and he was a Democrat, one of the most amusing guys that ever lived,” he said.

“He ran against Jimmy Carter for the nomination in 1976,” he said.

“After he had finally lost the last primary, … he said, ‘the people have spoken – the bastards.’ I kind of feel a bit like Mo Udall.”

When McCain ran for president in 2008 his slogan was “Country First.” But the decision by Republicans to let a xenophobe lead their party into the 2016 presidential election shows a sick and obvious allegiance their party over the continued progression of the United States.

Those “bastards!”

Donald Trump #Politics

John McCain Admits – I Could Lose in Arizona Because of Donald Trump – Audio

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Arizona Republican Senator, John McCain, has admitted that he has no other choice but to fall in line like a good sheep and follow the fox that is Donald Trump where ever that fox leads. But just a month ago when John McCain thought he was talking off the record, he told an audience about his fears having Donald Trump being at the top of the Republican presidential ticket, and the misery he face in trying to win his Arizona senate seat again.

“If you listen to or watch Hispanic media in the state or in the country, you will see it’s all anti-Trump,” McCain, the 2008 GOP presidential nominee, said at the event. “The Hispanic community is roused and angry in a way that I have never seen in 30 years.”

McCain, who chairs the Senate Armed Services Committee, blamed Trump’s remarks that Mexican immigrants are “rapists” and “murderers,” along with his proposal to build a wall along the Mexican border, for Latino voters’ anger.

“Frankly, there’s an element of nativism to it,” the senator said.

Audio

Canadian #Politics

John McCain – Ted Cruz’s Canadian Birth Might Be an Issue

Canadian born Ted Cruz recently renounced his Canadian citizenship and is now trying to be an American president.

In addition to Donald Trump and others – even some in Cruz’s own Republican party – the questions are swirling. Can someone born in another country be a Natural Born U.S citizen.

John McCain is rightfully questioning how Ted Cruz, who held dual citizenship and thus, considered himself a Canadian a little over a year ago, can now run for president of the United States.

In an interview Wednesday on Phoenix radio station 550 KFYI’s Chris Merill Show, McCain said he “doesn’t know” whether Cruz’s birth in Canada makes him eligible to be president. Cruz, whose father was born in Cuba, asserts that he is a U.S. citizen because his mother was an American.

“I know that came up in my race because I was born in Panama, but I was born in the Canal Zone which is a territory. Barry Goldwater was born in Arizona when it was territory when he ran in 1964,” McCain said.

“That’s different from being born on foreign soil. I think there is a question. I’m not a constitutional scholar on that, but I think it’s worth looking into. I don’t think it’s illegitimate to look into it.”

Asked if the Supreme Court might have to weigh in on the “natural born citizen” issue, McCain said, “It may be, that may be the case.”